February 13

Harvest Monday 12/02/18

Stored vegetables

We grew a lot of winter squash this year; Crown Prince, Waltham Butternut  and Hunter – a type of butternut.

Here they are after we had harvested them in October . As you can see, the bench is quite full. We ate the Butternut squash first because they do not last as long as the Crown Prince which will still be going strong in May.  There were five Crown Prince in total and they all grew on one plant. Normally I have five plants each with one squash on so I do put the vigour of the one and only plant that survived the slugs down to no-dig. I have also just noticed that there is an Uchiki Kuri, the bright orange one, in there as well.


This is what the bench looks like today. Just the Crown Prince to go and they are probably the best-tasting of all of them.

New no-dig bed

I have created  a new bed for some squash this year on a slight slope. Being a no-dig gardener, I have put cardboard down first, watered it, and then manure and home-made compost on top  and covered it with black plastic that lets the rain through.  A new bed in 15 minutes. I reckon I will get three squash plants in it.

It is not essential to put compost on top of the manure but I have found that plants seemed to do better in that mix rather than just compost or just manure.  That could be more about my compost and manure than anything else. The compost I have is full of weed seed because it was made before I got on top of the weeds which is why I covered the bed with black plastic. Again, it isn’t essential to do this but beds that I haven’t covered, where I used my compost, do have weeds growing in them. I need to get the hoe out!

I am as desperate as everyone else to start sowing seeds but the weather is so cold at the moment.  I might sow some chilli seeds in a propagator on the kitchen windowsill but that is all until this cold snap disappears.

Multi-sown seeds

I really enjoyed Charles Dowding’s latest video about growing multi-sown module leeks. He certainly seems to grow a lot in a small space which is what I want to do. Leeks are one of the seeds I will be sowing soon.  I have Musselburgh which were free with the magazine Kitchen Garden and are ready from October onwards; Tadorna, which I have not grown before,  are ready in December  and Blue Solaise which are ready from November onwards.  With these three, I should be able to have leeks throughout the winter and into the early spring. I planted 50 leeks last year and they are just about to run out now so I would say I need another 20 at least.


And so to the harvest. I really can’t show kale again which doesn’t leave much to show this week.  I do have large clumps of parsley in the polytunnel and so a salad of parsley, cucumber and tomatoes all chopped really small would go well with my chicken tagine tonight.  I know people talk about the hungry gap starting in April/May but mine seems to start now!  I do still have a freezer half-full of blackberries, raspberries and black currants which we eat for breakfast every morning.

What is the best fruit or vegetable you have stored over winter?

Tags: , ,

Posted February 13, 2018 by alijoy in category bed preparation, February, harvest monday, herbs, squash

4 thoughts on “Harvest Monday 12/02/18

  1. Dave @OurHappyAcres

    It’s interesting to hear how you made your no-dig bed. I did a similar thing several years ago when I expanded my kitchen garden. We’re having a hungry gap here as well, so I know how that goes. We do have quite a few squashes and sweet potatoes in storage though, and we are enjoying them often.

    1. alijoy (Post author)

      If i can find a grower who sells just 5 slips of sweet potatoes, I will grow them again. Most seem to sell them in bunches of 10 or 15 and that will be too many for my polytunnel.

  2. Kathy

    Really interested to see your no-dig beds, and if your squashes are anything to go by they sure are successful. We are short on variety of fresh harvests here too… makes you glad for what you have stored, doesn’t it?

  3. Phuong

    It looks like your winter squashes did incredibly well. And I’ve been watching the Charles Dowding videos from the link you posted, so interesting. I’ll be trying his leek and onion method.


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *